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Only one week left to register for DrupalCon New Orleans

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DrupalCon New Orleans is May 9-13th. The schedule is now available on the website, so you can start planning out your week.

See the Schedule

With 130 sessions in 13 tracks across 3 days, 88 Birds of a Feather (BOF) roundtable talks, plus keynotes, sprinting opportunities, an expo hall full of exhibitors, and Monday training sessions and summits galore, there’s no shortage of great things to do at DrupalCon New Orleans.

To view your schedule, just click the “My Schedule” button on the main schedule page. You’ll be able to sort by day, making it easy to see what your plans are every step of the way through the convention.

To add an item to your schedule, open the session information and click the “Add to schedule” button visible under the time and location information. You can also remove items from your schedule either under the specific session page or on your schedule.

To claim a BOF, select the day and time you’d like to hold your BOF and click on ‘Create a BOF’ button in an available room and add in information about what you’ll be discussing. 

We have dozens of time slots to choose from, so the sooner you claim a BOF, the more likely it is that you'll reserve the time and space that's right for you.

See the BOFs

And remember, if you’re attending a training or summit on Monday, it won’t automatically be added to your schedule, so make sure you add it from its unique page on the website.

We hope you enjoy using the scheduler, and look forward to hearing your feedback when we see you at DrupalCon New Orleans. Just as a reminder, if you haven't yet purchased your DrupalCon ticket, do so soon -- regular ticket pricing ends in a little over a week!

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Front page news: Drupal News

How is Drupal 8 doing?

jeu, 04/28/2016 - 22:46

Republished from buytaert.net

The one big question I get asked over and over these days is: "How is Drupal 8 doing?". It's understandable. Drupal 8 is the first new version of Drupal in five years and represents a significant rethinking of Drupal.

So how is Drupal 8 doing? With less than half a year since Drupal 8 was released, I'm happy to answer: outstanding!

As of late March, Drupal.org counted over 60,000 Drupal 8 sites. Looking back at the first four months of Drupal 7, about 30,000 sites had been counted. In other words, Drupal 8 is being adopted twice as fast as Drupal 7 had been in its first four months following the release.

As we near the six-month mark since releasing Drupal 8, the question "How is Drupal 8 doing?" takes on more urgency for the Drupal community with a stake in its success. For the answer, I can turn to years of experience and say while the number of new Drupal projects typically slows down in the year leading up to the release of a new version; adoption of the newest version takes up to a full year before we see the number of new projects really take off.

Drupal 8 is the middle of an interesting point in its adoption cycle. This is the phase where customers are looking for budgets to pay for migrations. This is the time when people focus on learning Drupal 8 and its new features. This is when the modules that extend and enhance Drupal need to be ported to Drupal 8; and this is the time when Drupal shops and builders are deep in the three to six month sales cycle it takes to sell Drupal 8 projects. This is often a phase of uncertainty but all of this is happening now, and every day there is less and less uncertainty. Based on my past experience, I am confident that Drupal 8 will be adopted at "full-force" by the end of 2016.

A few weeks ago I launched the Drupal 2016 product survey to take pulse of the Drupal community. I plan to talk about the survey results in my DrupalCon keynote in New Orleans on May 10th but in light of this blog post I felt the results to one of the questions is worth sharing and commenting on sooner:


Over 1,800 people have answered that question so far. People were allowed to pick up to 3 answers for the single question from a list of answers. As you can see in the graph, the top two reasons people say they haven't upgraded to Drupal 8 yet are (1) the fact that they are waiting for contributed modules to become available and (2) they are still learning Drupal 8. The results from the survey confirm what we see every release of Drupal; it takes time for the ecosystem, both the technology and the people, to come along.

Fortunately, many of the most important modules, such as Rules, Pathauto, Metatag, Field Collection, Token, Panels, Services, and Workbench Moderation, have already been ported and tested for Drupal 8. Combined with the fact that many important modules, like Views and CKEditor, moved to core, I believe we are getting really close to being able to build most websites with Drupal 8.

The second reason people cited for not jumping onto Drupal 8 yet was that they are still learning Drupal 8. One of the great strengths of Drupal has long been the willingness of the community to share its knowledge and teach others how to work with Drupal. We need to stay committed to educating builders and developers who are new to Drupal 8, and DrupalCon New Orleans is an excellent opportunity to share expertise and learn about Drupal 8.

What is most exciting to me is that less than 3% answered that they plan to move off Drupal altogether, and therefore won't upgrade at all. Non-response bias aside, that is an incredible number as it means the vast majority of Drupal users plan to eventually upgrade.

Yes, Drupal 8 is a significant rethinking of Drupal from the version we all knew and loved for so long. It will take time for the Drupal community to understand Drupal's new design and capabilities and how to harness that power but I am confident Drupal 8 is the right technology at the right time, and the adoption numbers so far back that up. Expect Drupal 8 adoption to start accelerating.

Comment on buytaert.net

Front page news: Drupal News

Applaud the Drupal Maintainers

ven, 04/22/2016 - 19:18

Republished from buytaert.net

Today is another big day for Drupal as we just released Drupal 8.1.0. Drupal 8.1.0 is an important milestone as it is a departure from the Drupal 7 release schedule where we couldn't add significant new features until Drupal 8. Drupal 8.1.0 balances maintenance with innovation.

On my blog and in presentations, I often talk about the future of Drupal and where we need to innovate. I highlight important developments in the Drupal community, and push my own ideas to disrupt the status quo. People, myself included, like to talk about the shiny innovations, but it is crucial to understand that innovation is only a piece of how we grow Drupal's success. What can't be forgotten is the maintenance, the bug fixing, the work on Drupal.org and our test infrastructure, the documentation writing, the ongoing coordination and the processes that allow us to crank out stable releases.

We often recognize those who help Drupal innovate or introduce novel things, but today, I'd like us to praise those who maintain and improve what already exists and that was innovated years ago. So much of what makes Drupal successful is the "daily upkeep". The seemingly mundane and unglamorous effort that goes into maintaining Drupal has a tremendous impact on the daily life of hundreds of thousands of Drupal developers, millions of Drupal content managers, and billions of people that visit Drupal sites. Without that maintenance, there would be no stability, and without stability, no room for innovation.

Comment on buytaert.net

Front page news: Drupal News

Drupal 8.1.0 is now available

mer, 04/20/2016 - 10:48

Drupal 8.1.0, the first minor release of Drupal 8, is now available. With Drupal 8, we made significant changes in our release process, adopting semantic versioning and scheduled feature releases. This allows us to make extensive improvements to Drupal 8 in a timely fashion while still providing backwards compatibility. Drupal 8.1.0 is the first such update.

What's new in Drupal 8.1.x?

Drupal 8.1.0 comes with numerous improvements, including CKEditor WYSIWYG enhancements, added APIs, an improved help page, and two new experimental modules. (Experimental modules are provided with Drupal core for testing purposes, but are not yet fully supported.)

Download Drupal-8.1.0 Experimental UI for migrations from Drupal 6 and 7

Drupal 8.1.0 now includes the Migrate Drupal UI module, which provides a user interface for Drupal core migrations. Use it to migrate Drupal 6 or 7 sites to Drupal 8. The user guide on migrating from Drupal 6 or 7 to Drupal 8 has full documentation. Note that the Drupal 8 Migrate module suite is still experimental and has known issues. Read below for specific information on migrating Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 sites with 8.1.0. (Always back up your data before performing a migration and review the results carefully.)

BigPipe for perceived performance

The Drupal 8 BigPipe module provides an advanced implementation of Facebook's BigPipe page rendering strategy, leading to greatly improved perceived performance for pages with dynamic, personalized, or uncacheable content. See the BigPipe documentation.

CKEditor WYSIWYG spellchecking and language button

Drupal 8.0.0 included the CKEditor module (a WYSIWYG editor), but it was not previously possible to use your browser's built-in spell checker with it to check the text. With Drupal 8.1.0, spellchecking is now enabled within CKEditor as well.

Another great improvement is the addition of the optional language markup button in CKEditor. When configured to appear in your editing toolbar, it allows you to assign language information to parts of the text, which is useful for accessibility and machine processing.

Improved help page with tours

Drupal 8.0.0 included a new system for help tutorials called tours with the core Tour module. In Drupal 8.1.0, we made these tours easier to discover by listing them in the administrative help overview at /admin/help.

The help overview page is also more flexible now, so contributed modules can add sections to it and themes can override its appearance more easily. You can read more about the new system in the change record for the updated help page, or refer to the Tour API documentation for how to add tours for your modules.

Rendered entities in Views fields

Drupal 8.1.0 now includes a rendered entity field handler for Views, which allows placing a fully rendered entity within a view field. For example, this feature could be used to display a rendered user profile for each node author in a table listing node content. (This feature was provided by the Entity contributed module in Drupal 7, but had not yet been available in Drupal 8.)

Support for JavaScript automated testing

Drupal 8.1.0 adds support for automated testing of JavaScript, which will mean fewer bugs with Drupal's JavaScript functionality in the future as we write new tests for it. (Read more about how to run the JavaScript tests.) There are also other improvements to the testing system, including improved reporting of PHPUnit and other test results.

Improved Composer support

Starting with Drupal 8.1.x, Drupal core and its dependencies are packaged by Composer on Drupal.org. This means that sites and modules can now also use Composer to manage all of their third-party dependencies (rather than having to work around the vendor directory that previously shipped with core).

Developer API improvements

Minor releases like Drupal 8.1.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features. Read the 8.1.0 release notes for more details on the many improvements for developers in this release.

What does this mean to me?
Drupal 8 site owners

Update to 8.1.0 to continue receiving bug and security fixes. The next bugfix release, 8.1.1, is scheduled for May 4, 2016.

Updating your site from 8.0.6 to 8.1.0 with update.php is exactly the same as updating from 8.0.5 to 8.0.6. Modules, themes, and translations may need small changes for this minor release, so test the update carefully before updating your production site.

Drupal 6 site owners

Drupal 6 is not supported anymore. Create a Drupal 8 site and try migrating your data into it as soon as possible. Your Drupal 6 site can still remain up and running while you test migrating your Drupal 6 data into your new Drupal 8 site. Note that there are known issues with the experimental Migrate module suite. If you find a new bug not covered by one of these issues, your detailed bug report with steps to reproduce is a big help!

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is still fully supported and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout all minor releases of Drupal 8.

The new Migrate Drupal UI for Migrate also allows migrating a Drupal 7 site into a Drupal 8 site, but the migration path from Drupal 7 to 8 is not complete, so you may encounter errors or missing migrations when you try to migrate. That said, since your Drupal 7 site can remain up and running while you test migrating into a new Drupal 8 site, you can help us stabilize the Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration path! Testing and bug reports from your real-world Drupal 7 sites will help us stabilize this functionality sooner for everyone. (Search the known issues.)

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 8.1.0 are backwards-compatible, so modules, themes, and translations that support Drupal 8.0.x will be compatible with 8.1.x as well. However, the new version does include some string changes, minor UI changes, and internal API changes (as well as more significant changes to experimental modules like the Migrate suite). This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. See the announcement of the 8.1.0 release candidate for more background information.